CRM

What does a CRM manager do?

Liucija Adomaite
LAST UPDATED
June 7, 2024
READING TIME
7 min.

Over 8 in 10 businesses use CRM systems for sales reporting and process automation, according to the data.

And since a majority of modern-day businesses rely primarily on CRMs when handling their customer data, they need a person to put in charge of it. Meet a CRM manager. 

CRM manager is a role that's crucial in building and maintaining strong customer relationships.

CRM manager is responsible for implementing and optimizing customer relationship management strategies and CRM systems to enhance customer satisfaction and boost revenue.

This article analyzes the role of a CRM manager in a company, including the duties, skills, and benefits they bring.

We will also get into why this position is so high in demand right now, as well as the average salary you can expect from it.

What is a CRM Manager?

With 91% of companies using a CRM system, it's no surprise that CRM managers are in very high demand right now.

A CRM Manager (Client Relationship Manager) is a person who creates systems and strategies that enhance the relationship between a company and its customers.

CRM manager uses a variety of skill set including sales, marketing, and customer service. 

The goal of CRM manager is to advice the company of how to communicate with customers more effectively, how to implement and leverage CRM software, and how to better address their customer needs and pain points to boost more sales. 

What Does a CRM Manager Do? 

A CRM manager is responsible for all customer-related processes in a company.

That includes overall CRM strategy, implementation of a CRM system, CRM goals, data analysis and insights, customer behavior reports, team alignment, and customer focus approach.

Here is a closer look at what a CRM manager does:

  • Designs and executes the overall CRM strategy. This involves selecting the right CRM software, customizing it for the company's needs, and ensuring its smooth integration with existing workflows.
  • Acts as a data analyst. A CRM manager analyzes customer behavior and purchase history to identify trends and opportunities. This data is then used to improve marketing campaigns, personalize customer interactions, and boost sales.
  • Aligns teams in different departments like sales, marketing, and customer support. They ensure everyone is on the same page regarding CRM usage and that customer data is shared effectively.
  • Ensures customer focus at all sales stages and workflow processes. CRM manager's main goal is to strengthen customer relationships. They work to improve customer satisfaction, identify upselling or cross-selling opportunities, and develop strategies to retain loyal customers.

In short, a CRM manager transforms daily customer interactions and into a streamlined and data-driven strategy for business growth. 

CRM manager: key challenges

The role of a CRM manager is often not clearly defined, and it has quite a few challenges to be aware of when thinking about this career path. 

Here are the main challenges a CRM manager will have to tackle:

1. A CRM manager is an undefined role.

The main challenge of hiring or being a CRM manager in a company is the fact that the CRM manager role and their responsibilities can vary greatly in each company.

Many new CRM managers must work independently to define their role and targets, and what they want to achieve with a particular CRM strategy.

Often, starting from scratch and creating their position becomes the first task for a customer manager who joining the company.

2. A CRM manager must align all teams and ensure smooth user adoption.

Another frequent challenge a CRM manager has to deal with is the fact that getting everyone on board with the new CRM can be tricky.

CRM manager has to convince every team member that there's value in using a CRM platform because CRM alone is worth nothing if people don't know how to use it or don't want to use it.

CRM managers need to clearly demonstrate the value of a particular CRM system and train their teams to use it.

3. A CRM manager must pursue change and convince people of its benefits.

The third challenge comes down to CRM transformation, a digitalization of the company's existing workflows and sales processes when implementing a new CRM.

The truth is that implementing a new CRM disrupts existing workflows, and not everyone in a team may be happy with the change.

A CRM manager needs to be a champion for change who's ready to guide the team through the adjustment period.

4. A CRM manager must leverage data for data-driven decisions.

The fourth huge challenge for a newly joined CRM manager comes down to what they do with all the CRM data they have.

In fact, CRM itself is worth nothing without the data, and how well it's handled.

A CRM manager needs to implement strategies for data entry, cleaning, and maintaining data hygiene. Poor data equals poor decision making, and high quality data leads to quality data-driven decisions.

CRM manager: daily duties

A CRM manager's position is closely tied to the CRM strategy and planning and focuses on the long-term goals.

However, there are numerous daily tasks that are short-term focuses they have to do:

Some of the most common CRM manager daily tasks are:

  • Updating and managing customer accounts in the CRM system
  • Analyzing customer behavior and preparing reports
  • Supervising customer service reps
  • Managing the sales team and customer service team
  • Contacting VIP clients and prospects
  • Handling customer complaints
  • Scheduling and coordinating interdepartmental meetings and presentations
  • Monitoring strategy implementation in real-time
  • Working with IT on tech issues that could damage the customer experience

In general, a CRM manager's day at work is very fast-paced and involves a lot of multitasking.

Their daily tasks often overlap with other positions, like marketing, sales, and even customer support.

So, you can think of a CRM manager as a multi-purpose Swiss knife that focuses on all customer-related things.

CRM manager skills

As you may expect, not everyone can be a successful CRM manager. The role requires a significant set of both technical and soft skills.

Here are the most important ones:

  • CRM Software Expertise: They should have a strong understanding of CRM functionalities, ideally with experience in configuring and customizing a specific CRM platform relevant to your industry.
  • Data Analysis and Reporting: The ability to extract insights from customer data is crucial. Look for someone who can generate reports, identify trends, and translate data into actionable strategies.
  • System Integration: CRM systems work best when they talk to other business tools. Experience with integrating CRMs with marketing automation, email platforms, or other relevant software is a plus.
  • Communication and Interpersonal Skills: Building relationships is a core CRM function. The manager should be an excellent communicator, both verbally and in writing. They must be able to clearly explain CRM processes, build rapport with colleagues from different departments, and present data-driven insights to leadership.
  • Leadership and Training: CRM managers often mentor and train their teams on using the CRM system effectively. Look for someone who can motivate and inspire others, provide clear guidance, and troubleshoot any issues.
  • Problem-Solving and Analytical Thinking: Inevitably, challenges arise. Your ideal CRM manager should be a resourceful problem-solver who can analyze situations, develop solutions, and adapt to changing circumstances.
  • Customer Focus: A passion for understanding and exceeding customer expectations is essential. The CRM manager should be data-driven but empathetic, always looking for ways to improve customer satisfaction and build loyalty.

From a professional experience standpoint, a CRM manager should have:

  • A diploma/degree in sales, marketing, business, or a related industry
  • Minimum three years experience in a sales, marketing, or supervisory customer service position
  • Experience in data extraction/analysis
  • Experience in creating campaigns and managing projects
  • Analytical, data-driven experience in data-processing software 
  • Experience in CRM systems

Typical CRM manager salary

CRM Manager: The average CRM Manager salary in the US is $117,232 per year, according to Talent.com. Entry-level CRM managers can expect to earn around $92,611, with the most experienced making up to $160,000 annually.

CRM Specialist: According to Talent.com, the average CRM Specialist salary in the US is slightly lower than a CRM manager's, and it's roughly around $74,925 per year. Entry-level positions start at $57,314, while more experienced CRM specialists can make up to $105,028.

The total number of advertising, promotions and marketing managers is expected to grow by 6% until the year 2029, which is faster than the national average, according to The Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

Does your company need a CRM manager?

The decision of whether or not to hire a CRM manager depends on your specific needs and goals. It also depends on the budget you have for it, because implementing a CRM system, and hiring a CRM manager to handle and implement it can be costly. 

It's important to note that most big companies will need a CRM manager once they hit a high number of leads and customers. This is because a CRM manager builds and implements a long-term CRM strategy and plans specific actions to achieve it.

Moreover, your sales team may lack the expertise and knowledge of the big picture to make data-driven decisions. 

Key signs that you need a CRM manager

  • Disorganized Customer Data: If your customer information is scattered across spreadsheets, emails, or sticky notes, it's a strong indicator that a CRM can help. A CRM manager would centralize this data and ensure everyone has access to a single source of truth.
  • Team silos: If your sales and marketing teams are working in silos, a CRM manager is a solution. They will help to bridge the gap by creating a unified customer journey. This allows for more targeted marketing campaigns and improves lead nurturing.
  • Inefficient Workflows: If repetitive daily tasks consume too much valuable time for your sales and customer service teams, a CRM is the best solution for you.
  • Limited Sales Reporting: If you're struggling to track sales performance and identify areas for improvement, a CRM can provide valuable insights. A CRM manager can generate reports that uncover sales trends and help optimize your sales pipeline.
  • Low Customer Satisfaction: That's a huge sign that you need a CRM system and a CRM manager asap. A CRM can help you track customer interactions and identify areas where you can improve the customer experience. A CRM manager will use this data to develop strategies for boosting customer satisfaction.
  • Growth Stage: Even a small company that has a rapidly growing customer base will benefit from a CRM and the expertise of a CRM manager.

CRM manager tools

You just hired a CRM manager. What do you start with? Make sure you have all the appropriate software to hand it to them.

The best tools to give to your CRM manager are:

  • CRM, a customer relationship management system like Salesforce, HubSpot, or Zendesk Sell
  • Lead generation software and a lead management platform, OR a powerful all-in-one lead gen tool like lemlist
  • Task management software like Asana, Airtable, and ClickUp
  • Intercommunication software like Slack

If you're new to implementing CRM, make sure you learn our top insider CRM tips shared by the lemlist sales operations expert that will be a game-changer to your CRM strategy.

Get weekly outreach tips
SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Thanks! You've successfully subscribed to lemlist newsletter
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
G2 Rating
Price
Best for
Standout feature
Con
4.9
star
star
star
star
star
$30/mo
$75/mo
$2,999/mo
Large, distributed sales teams
AI evaluation precision, gamified KPIs
Lack of tracking system
4.6
star
star
star
star
star-half
Not publicly available
Sales operations and finance teams
Powerful configurability
Limited training resources and complex to navigate
4.4
star
star
star
star
star-half
Not publicly available
Mid-market and enterprise businesses
Comprehensive incentive management
Potentially high cost and steep learning curve
4.7
star
star
star
star
star-half
$15/user/mo
$40/user/mo
Enterprise: custom price
Complex sales structures and businesses of all sizes
Complex sales structures and businesses of all sizes
Steep learning curve
4.6
star
star
star
star
star-half
Not publicly available
Collaborative teams
Connected planning
Complexity and steep learning curve
4.6
star
star
star
star
star-half
Not publicly available
Companies with complex sales structures
Complex incentive compensation management (ICM) with high efficiency and accuracy
Complexity for smaller teams and potentially high costs
4.7
star
star
star
star
star-half
Not publicly available
Companies who want to automate commission calculations and payouts
Simplicity and ease of use
Lack of features like redirection
4.7
star
star
star
star
star-half
$30/user/mo
$35/user/mo
Custom: upon request
Businesses that need a comprehensive and user-friendly sales compensation management software
Ease of use and adoption
Lack of ability to configure the product based on user needs
4.8
star
star
star
star
star-half
Not publicly available
Companies with modern sales culture and businesses who want real-time insights
A built-in dispute management and real-time visibility
Users say it works slowly, customer support is slow
4.9
star
star
star
star
star
$30/user/mo
$50/user/mo
Smaller sales teams
Powerful automation
Lesser user base and average user interface
4.7
star
star
star
star
star-half
Not publicly available
Companies with scalable needs
Automated Commission Calculations
Lack of filtering by date, no mobile app
ERP vs. CRM
ERP
CRM
Summary
Backbone of a business's internal operations.
Backbone of customer-centric interactions and operations.
Goal
To centralize and streamline core business processes in a company.
To increase customer experience, satisfaction and loyalty, and boost sales.
Focus
Internal operations and processes across departments (finance, accounting, inventory, supply chain, HR, and sales).
All interactions with leads and customers.
Manages
Internal business data like financial data, inventory levels, production details, supply chain, HR info.
All customer data like contact info, purchase history, communication history, customer preferences and more.
Users
Finance, accounting, operations, supply chain, and HR departments.
Customer-facing teams like sales, marketing, and customer service.
Benefits
Streamlines operations, improves data accuracy, enhances decision-making, boosts collaboration, increases productivity.
Improves customer relationships, increases sales, strengthens customer service, personalizes marketing campaigns, provides insights.
Price
$150 per user per year on average.
$10 to $30 per user per month on average.
PRM Tool
Rating
Feature
Pro
Con
Mobile App
Integrations
Free Plan
Pricing
4.65
star
star
star
star
star-half
Org-wide alignment
User-friendly layout and database
Suboptimal as a personal CRM
square-check
Lack of tracking system
square-check
Team: $20/month
Business: $45/month
4.7
star
star
star
star
star-half
Social Media Integration
Easy contact data collection
No marketing/sales features
square-check
Lack of tracking system
square-xmark
7-day trial
$12/month
4.75
star
star
star
star
star-half
Block Functions
High customization capability
Not a dedicated CRM
square-check
Limited
square-check
Plus: €7.50/month
Business: €14/month
N/A
Open-source
Open-source flexibility
Requires extensive manual input
square-xmark
Limited
square-check
Self-hosted
$9/month or
$90/year
3.1
star
star
star
Simple iOS app
Ideal for non-tech-savvy users
iPhone only
square-check
iOS only
Limited
square-xmark
1-month trial
$1.49/month or
$14.99/month
3.6
star
star
star
star-half
Smart Contact Management
Feature-rich and flexible
Reported bugs
square-check
Rich
square-xmark
7-day trial
Premium: $13.99/month
Teams: $17.99/month
4.4
star
star
star
star
star-half
Customizable Interface
Customizable for teamwork
Pricey for personal use
square-check
Rich
square-xmark
Standard: $24/member
Premium: $39/member
4.7
star
star
star
star
star-half
Integrated Calling
Integrated Calling
Too sales-oriented & pricey
square-check
Rich
square-xmark
14-day trial
Startup: $59/user/month
Professional: $329/user/month
4.8
star
star
star
star
star
Business Card Scanning
Business Card Scanning
Mobile only
square-check
Limited
square-check
$9.99/month
4.45
star
star
star
star
star-half
160+ app integrations
Comprehensive integrations
No free app version
square-check
Rich
square-xmark
14-day trial
$29.90/month or
$24.90/month (billed annually)
Capterra Rating
Free Trial
Free Plan
Starting Price (excluding the free plan)
Maximum Price (for the most expensive plan)
Best for
4.5
star
star
star
star
star-half
square-check
14-day
square-check
€15/month/seat billed annually
€792/month/3 seats billed annually + €45/month for each extra seat
Versatility and free plan
4.2
star
star
star
star
square-check
30-day
square-xmark
But it offers reduced price to authorised nonprofit organisations
€25/user/month
€500/user/month billed annually (includes Einstein AI)
Best overall operational CRM
4.3
star
star
star
star
star-half
square-xmark
square-check
Limited to 3 users
Comprehensive incentive management
€52/user/month billed annually
Small-medium businesses and automation
4.5
star
star
star
star
star-half
square-check
14-day
square-xmark
€14/seat/month billed annually
€99/seat/month billed annually
Sales teams and ease of use
4.1
star
star
star
star
square-xmark
square-check
Limited 10 users
$9.99/user/month billed annually
$64.99/user/month billed annually
Free plan for very small teams up to 10
CRM goal
Increase the sales conversion rate for qualified leads from marketing automation campaigns by 10% in the next 6 months.
SMART Breakdown
1. Specific: It targets a specific area (conversion rate) for a defined segment (qualified leads from marketing automation).
2. Measurable: The desired increase (10%) is a clear metric, and the timeframe (6 months) allows for progress tracking.
3. Achievable: A 10% increase is possible based on historical data and potential improvements.
4. Relevant: Boosting sales from marketing efforts aligns with overall business objectives.
5. Time-bound: The 6-month timeframe creates urgency and a clear target date.
Actions
Step 1: Refine lead qualification criteria to ensure high-quality leads are nurtured through marketing automation.
Step 2: Personalize marketing automation campaigns based on lead demographics, interests, and behavior.
Step 3: Develop targeted landing pages with clear calls to action for qualified leads.
Step 4: Implement lead scoring to prioritize high-potential leads for sales follow-up.
Step 5: Track and analyze campaign performance to identify areas for optimization.
Outcomes
Increased sales and revenue
Improved marketing automation ROI
Marketing and sales alignment
Data-driven marketing optimization

What you should look at next

Receive weekly outreach tips in your inbox, sent to 210 000+ salespeople, marketers, founders, and entrepreneurs worldwide!

Subscribe to the lemlist newsletter
You've successfully subscribed to the lemlist newsletter!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.